previous posts

This page includes all of our previous blog posts categorised by their general theme. Click on the links in the menu or the title of each category to access the comprehensive list of each section.

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The Fixation of Meaning: Pornography Then and Now

By Andrea Zuliani / 4 November 2021

by Andrea Zuliani (he/they) The sexual revolution of the eighteenth century has been one of the most famous events in history, as it involved the disruption of both the political and social characteristics of states. The analysis of this text will primarily focus on the use of queer pornography. It will focus on both the… Read More »The Fixation of Meaning: Pornography Then and Now

Policing and Pride

By James Whitfield / 7 October 2021

by James Whitfield (he/him/his) Since the inception of the first UK pride, it has been a mix of protest and celebration. Often both have been so fused it is impossible to differentiate the two. However, over the years, many have questioned whether the element of protest is still present within pride. Arguments critiquing pride point… Read More »Policing and Pride

Nineteenth Century Prisons and Gender Diversity.

By James Whitfield / 19 May 2021

By James Whitfield (he/him/his) The following post came about while I was sifting through the British Newspaper Archives. My purpose was not to provide a particularly systemic account of history but look for small stories or narratives that could highlight gender diversity within the prison system. I wanted to focus upon the nineteenth century, primarily… Read More »Nineteenth Century Prisons and Gender Diversity.

On The Thought of Renaming Myself: Why I Like My Deadname But At The Same Time Hate It

By queerdisrupt / 2 December 2021

by Adrian (he/him/his) Most Indonesians only have one name. That’s right, their first name is also their official name. Depending on their ethnicity, they may also go by their nickname—usually given by parents or grandparents based on their personality or physical build. Such a name does not appear on government-issued documents. My birth name has… Read More »On The Thought of Renaming Myself: Why I Like My Deadname But At The Same Time Hate It

A Letter to My Body – Warped Canvas

By Phoenix Wilks / 18 November 2021

by Phoenix Wilks (they/them/theirs) You got a new coat of paint today. A new art piece to distract from what you are. If the artwork is beautiful maybe no one will notice that you are warped. Maybe I won’t. And it’s not that there’s anything wrong with the shape of you, in many ways you… Read More »A Letter to My Body – Warped Canvas

Examining the Role of Family and Queerness in Torrey Peters’ Detransition, Baby

By queerdisrupt / 21 October 2021

by Chelsea Gallagher (she/her/hers) The word “transition” can be traced back to the Latin word “transitionem”. Originally used as a noun to describe “going across or over”, but what is the power it holds today? With the evolution of self-discovery tied with gender, we find ourselves free to transition constantly to promote change, growth, and… Read More »Examining the Role of Family and Queerness in Torrey Peters’ Detransition, Baby

On The Thought of Renaming Myself: Why I Like My Deadname But At The Same Time Hate It

By queerdisrupt / 2 December 2021

by Adrian (he/him/his) Most Indonesians only have one name. That’s right, their first name is also their official name. Depending on their ethnicity, they may also go by their nickname—usually given by parents or grandparents based on their personality or physical build. Such a name does not appear on government-issued documents. My birth name has… Read More »On The Thought of Renaming Myself: Why I Like My Deadname But At The Same Time Hate It

A Letter to My Body – Warped Canvas

By Phoenix Wilks / 18 November 2021

by Phoenix Wilks (they/them/theirs) You got a new coat of paint today. A new art piece to distract from what you are. If the artwork is beautiful maybe no one will notice that you are warped. Maybe I won’t. And it’s not that there’s anything wrong with the shape of you, in many ways you… Read More »A Letter to My Body – Warped Canvas

Nineteenth Century Prisons and Gender Diversity.

By James Whitfield / 19 May 2021

By James Whitfield (he/him/his) The following post came about while I was sifting through the British Newspaper Archives. My purpose was not to provide a particularly systemic account of history but look for small stories or narratives that could highlight gender diversity within the prison system. I wanted to focus upon the nineteenth century, primarily… Read More »Nineteenth Century Prisons and Gender Diversity.

Bois of Isolation – Queering Gender Binaries in the Confines of Pandemic

By queerdisrupt / 4 December 2020

By Dawn Woolley (she/her) and AC Davidson (she/they). Do we experience and express our gender identities differently in pandemic lockdown? Can sharing selfies via Instagram be a way to collectively queer the gender binary? These questions and our own experiences of lockdown led us to set up Bois of Isolation (BOI) – a platform on… Read More »Bois of Isolation – Queering Gender Binaries in the Confines of Pandemic

Examining the Role of Family and Queerness in Torrey Peters’ Detransition, Baby

By queerdisrupt / 21 October 2021

by Chelsea Gallagher (she/her/hers) The word “transition” can be traced back to the Latin word “transitionem”. Originally used as a noun to describe “going across or over”, but what is the power it holds today? With the evolution of self-discovery tied with gender, we find ourselves free to transition constantly to promote change, growth, and… Read More »Examining the Role of Family and Queerness in Torrey Peters’ Detransition, Baby

‘one can love’ Richard Bruce Nugent, Fire!!, and the Harlem Renaissance

By queerdisrupt / 1 July 2021

By Jack Bowman (he/him) American artist and author Richard Bruce Nugent was the first openly gay Black writer. Although operating within what is now widely understood as a vibrant artistic scene of gay, lesbian, and bisexual participants, Nugent was one of the only expressly out members of the Harlem Renaissance. He wrote and created from… Read More »‘one can love’ Richard Bruce Nugent, Fire!!, and the Harlem Renaissance

Valentines Poetry, 2021: Untitled.

By queerdisrupt / 14 February 2021

By Phoenix (they/them) Am I a one and done kinda bitch?or am I a one and two and breathless whispersover an ocean. Two and threeand me and you and themand who needs to define what we are? we are breathlessand eternal and never ending.the line was drawn in the sandand we kicked it up into… Read More »Valentines Poetry, 2021: Untitled.

The Fixation of Meaning: Pornography Then and Now

By Andrea Zuliani / 4 November 2021

by Andrea Zuliani (he/they) The sexual revolution of the eighteenth century has been one of the most famous events in history, as it involved the disruption of both the political and social characteristics of states. The analysis of this text will primarily focus on the use of queer pornography. It will focus on both the… Read More »The Fixation of Meaning: Pornography Then and Now

‘one can love’ Richard Bruce Nugent, Fire!!, and the Harlem Renaissance

By queerdisrupt / 1 July 2021

By Jack Bowman (he/him) American artist and author Richard Bruce Nugent was the first openly gay Black writer. Although operating within what is now widely understood as a vibrant artistic scene of gay, lesbian, and bisexual participants, Nugent was one of the only expressly out members of the Harlem Renaissance. He wrote and created from… Read More »‘one can love’ Richard Bruce Nugent, Fire!!, and the Harlem Renaissance

Two people holding hands at a Pride parade

notes on protest & breath

By queerdisrupt / 2 June 2021

By Claire Tunnacliffe (she/they) Over a year has passed, as we have collectively held ourselves in. Locked down and away from friends, family – blood or chosen, the places, streets, bars, clubs, community spaces, and routines many of us structure our lives around – often times our identities – in order to keep us and… Read More »notes on protest & breath

Ibi Profane’s: Dragged Through History Review

By queerdisrupt / 13 May 2020

A review of our first online event ‘Ibi Profane’s Dragged Through History’ by Hannah Ayres.

Event Review: Warwick Is Not (Always) White

By queerdisrupt / 17 March 2020

A review of Lola Olufemi’s ‘Uses of the Feminist Imagination’ by Somak Biswas.

Event Review: Nanette Screening

By queerdisrupt / 19 February 2020

A review of our Nanette screening by Nick Cherryman.