queer history

Policing and Pride

by James Whitfield (he/him/his) Since the inception of the first UK pride, it has been a mix of protest and celebration. Often both have been so fused it is impossible to differentiate the two. However, over the years, many have questioned whether the element of… Read More »Policing and Pride

Solidarity and Isolation in 1980s Britain to now – The Bradford Lesbian Line

Throughout LGBTQ+ history there has been a long-standing reliance on physical social spaces within the queer community (Anderson, Austin and Knee, 2020). Whether this is in queer support groups, Pride marches or socialising in queer clubs and bars, accessing these spaces allows us to feel… Read More »Solidarity and Isolation in 1980s Britain to now – The Bradford Lesbian Line

Image from the first OWAAD conference (1979)

‘I thanked the ancestors it is not something you can box up neatly’: uncovering stories of Black and Brown LGBTQ+ activism in post-war Britain

By Sue Lemos Black and Brown LGBTQ+ people have a vibrant history of activism and community spaces in Britain, but it was only until I delved into the ruckus! Black Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Trans cultural archive and Black and Brown lesbian herstories that I… Read More »‘I thanked the ancestors it is not something you can box up neatly’: uncovering stories of Black and Brown LGBTQ+ activism in post-war Britain

Queer(ying) Historical Fiction

The focus of this article is a Twitter thread that went viral in the latter half of 2018. Originally written by playwright Guillem Clua (@guillemclua) from Barcelona, Spain, it gained further popularity when translated into English by user @strangelyurie. Written by Hannah Ayres.

The Origins of Printed Gossip and Rumour in 18th Century Newspapers

Natalie Hanley-Smith, a PhD candidate in the History department at the University of Warwick, offers an introduction into a very interesting – and entertaining – aspect of her doctoral research. Were gossip ‘paragraphs’ simply entertainment for the upper-classes, or were they a very public way of exposing indecorous behaviour and deviation from social mores? Did they in fact facilitate discussion of the ‘rules’ of sexual and marital conduct and can we perhaps see in them a forerunner to the celebrity gossip so present in the media today?